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they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
>> eric: we'll be keeping tabs on egypt. >> shannon bream is next, live in washington. >> reporter: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who supp
of that craziness. >> the new protest out of egypt this morning because what started out as some protests in tahrir square has spilled over to other parts of the country. this all comes after thursday's decrees from egyptian president mohammed morsi basically saying you know that judiciary that we have? you know the judges that we have? if i make a decision, they are not going to be able to review anything that i do anymore. essentially cutting out the judiciary becoming by all accounts a dictator. >> yeah. all the checks on his power were essentially removed. and it did appear that this guy became a dick day or two overnight. what was worrisome about it is how quickly it all happened. and basically a 12 to 24 hour span after the united states congratulated mohammed morsi on doing such a great job helping to broker a peace agreement between hamas and israel which may beer maybe not. maybe he did a great job. there are also arms being smuggled through egypt so maybe he got too much credit. >> he seized the day. his name is on top of all newspapers. here i am, i need to consolidate power this morning
and breaking news. jon: there are massive protests in egypt right now against president mohammed morsi's latest power grab. as anger grows the muslim brotherhood announces plans for its own demonstration. >>> police combing a million dollar mansion for clues after a violent home invasion. >>> plus there is still time to try your luck as the powerball jackpot hit as record 500 million smackers. it is ail "happening now." jon: think if that half a billion buck is not enough to touch the national debt. jenna: i like when you say smackers. that gets us into the lottery. jon: day two of crucial meetings on capitol hill. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. susan rice is meeting with support bob corker of tennessee. she just wrapped up talks with susan collins of maine. that topic is benghazi. what did ambassador rice know about the terror attacks on the u.s. consulate that killed four americans on september 11? she faced a lot of criticism for comments made in the days following the attacks blaming it on a demonstration that got out of hand. by the way she wasn't the only one. that is something we h
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
and it's the ultimate nn trying to declare the judiciary in egypt basically null and void. >> yeah, look, morsi came out last week looking rather good, like a statesman and he helped organization the cease-fire and reined hamas in and took responsibility and moved immediately from that to give himself dictatorial powers. if those dictatorial powers are taken by him the arab spring is pretty much over and democratization is pretty much over. i'men couraged to see how many people come into the streets and they don't want to trade mubarak to the theocracy that morsi and the brotherhood are proposing. i'm not sure at that morsi is going to give up that easily. >> alisyn: thank you for your insight. good to see you. up next it's a state in debt. why is illinois spending for cable for prisoners and on pig races. and a man gets through security with a woman's boarding pass? how was that done and is anything being done about it. ♪ ♪ ♪ hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the be
today. >> charlie d'agata in gaza city, thanks. >>> there's new pressure for egypt to step up and negotiate an end to the current round of fighting. this morning there are conflicting reports out of cairo that israel and gaza could be close to a truce. clarissa ward is in the egyptian capital. good morning, clarissa. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. the egyptian president morsi has said repeatedly he hopes to announce a cease-fire agreement imminently. but cbs news has spoken to a source very close to the hamas delegation here in cairo. they said that so far these talks are not going anywhere. now, one of the reasons for that may be that hamas is making some pretty big demands in exchange for stopping its rocket attacks on israel. primarily it wants an end to the israeli blockade of the gaza strip. israel unlikely to budge on that issue because of fears that lifting the blockade would lead to an influx of weapons that could get into the hands of militants inside gaza. as you said, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon is on his way to cairo now for talks as diplomati
break out in egypt as police fired teargas into the crowds. here are some of those scenes. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close ele
. i find his role in all of this fascinating. i mean here, taking over egypt after the arab spring, an ally whether we approved of what he, did he was an ally for so long. coming out of the accords. does egypt see its role as a peacemaker. does it gain currency by being that? >> i think from the american perspective, egypt is a necessary broker. they consider hamas a terrorist entity and so the u.s. does not directly deal with hamas. in order to be a broker between both sides the u.s. necessarily needs to deal with egypt. >> yeah. you know, john mccain, we see hillary clinton there. john mccain had another opinion about who he thinks should be over in the middle east talking to these people. here's john mccain. >> find someone even as high ranking frankly as former president bill clinton. to go and be the negotiator. i know he would hate me for saying that but we need a person of enormous prestige and influence to have these parties sit down together as an honest broker. >> you know, when we hear mccain s
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted their sources but also hearing seniors, including the arab league, suggests that leadership of various countries and organizations are coming to the region for an announcement which the vetting is that this evening hillary clinton will be meeting israeli prime minister and the betting is at that time the ceas
of peace looking at the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia and libya. the arab spring are in the state of transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each. this took place earlier this week in washington. it's two hours. >> good morning everyone. i'm steve heydemann for issues of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on the securities sector reform in the arab world and some rsvp to me have been scared by the false rumor that it would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that is not the case. so you do not need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you here with us all this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important but also especially urgent. i do not think that it is an exaggeration to say what happens with the security sectors in the arab world and by security sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus that
over egypt after the arab spring. mubarak was an ally to the country for so long, coming out of the camp david accords where sedatesadat was. >> i think from the american perspective egypt is a necessary broker. they consider hamas a terrorist entity. the u.s. does not directly deal with hamas. in order to be a broker between both sides the u.s. necessarily needs to deal with egypt. >> yes well, you know, john mccain we see hillary clinton there. john mccain had another opinion who he thinks should be over in the mideast talking to these people. >> even someone as high ranking frankly as former president bill clinton to go and be the negotiator. i know he would hate me for saying that, but we need someone of enormous prestige and influence to sit down with the parties together and work as a broker. >> when we see mccain saying something nice about a democrat, he has to go and say one more thing. this is john mccain once again. >> if this god-forbid violence escalates, if someone was there brokering the process and bringing a halt to it. now the president makes phone callscall
. now to egypt where the country's new president is winning big-time praise from the u.s. for helping to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the ne
the massive explosion in massachusetts. [chanting] >>> and what's happening in egypt after several days of violent clashes after the new leader's power grab. you know how much grandma wanted to be here for your fist christmas? you see grandma lives waaaay down here, and you live way up here. brian, your cousin, he's a little bit older than you, he lives here, in chicago. and your aunt lisa lives here, in baltimore. uncle earnie? waaay out in hawaii. but don't you worry, we will always be together for christmas. [ male announcer ] being together is the best part of the holidays and cheerios is happy to be part of the family. you just ate dallas! >>> well, clear skies for a few. a lot of fog for others. that dense fog advisory will go until 9:00 and it will be sunny. you can see that blanket of fog there. enjoy today because after today a lot of clouds and rain on the way later in the week. >>> 7:14. new this morning from bangladesh pictures of a second fire at that garment factory where 117 people were killed over the weekend. the fire itself has been contained. no one was hurt. we can a
funds. he says he is willing to begin peace negotiations. >> egypt's parliament, dominated by conservative muslims approved a new constitution early this morning. the assembly's more moderate members are crying foul. it is sparking another day of protests against president mohamed morsi. morsi's supporters plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on
. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> i'm kathy kay. egypt is young and fragile,
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17